You can find out more at digistump.com and get help on the digistump Wiki.

[Do not plug in your digispark before installing the Driver!!!]

Setting up your digispark in Windows for the 1st time use, including Windows 8.1

Tested on Windows 8.1 Pro, so not sure if this applies to Windows 8.

  • I know you’re excited but don’t plug your digispark in just yet, drivers need to be installed beforehand
  • Download the Arduino IDE (v1.04) with the Digispark Addons
  • Unzip the Arduino IDE to an easily accessible directory
  • For Windows 8 & 8.1 you must disable driver signature verification. This will restart your PC – Instructions here: http://www.howtogeek.com/167723/how-to-disable-driver-signature-verification-on-64-bit-windows-8.1-so-that-you-can-install-unsigned-drivers/
  • Make sure you have all USB devices removed/ejected, to minimise any chance of clashing
  • Before plugging in the Digispark or running the Arduino IDE you must install the driver.
  • To install the driver go into the folder you just unzipped and go to the “Digispark – Windows Driver” folder. Inside that folder run the InstallDriver executable file. Go through the wizard to install the Digispark driver
  • Plug in your digispark and your drivers should be installed
  • When complete go back to the folder you unzipped and run the Arduino executable to open the Arduino IDE.

 Loading and running your first Blink test

  • Start the Arduino IDE from wherever you extracted it, arduino.exe
  • Make sure the Digispark is selected under > Tools > Board
  • Make sure Digispark is selected under > Tools > Programmer
  • Click > File > Examples > Digispark_Examples > Start
  • Make sure your Digispark is unplugged
  • Click the ‘Upload’ button – an arrow pointing to the right and when it’s done compiling, plug your Digispark in
  • Your Digispark will after about 10 seconds start blinking – woohoo

Now play with the Delay which is in milliseconds to see what happens, remember you have an on and off delay. You’ll need to unplug and replug each time you want to load new code. Make up a USB cable with a switch to simplify this procedure.

If you have the RGB Shield

  1. Start the Arduino IDE from wherever you extracted it, arduino.exe
  2. Make sure the Digispark is selected under > Tools > Board
  3. Make sure Digispark is selected under > Tools > Programmer
  4. Click > File > Examples > DigisparkRGB > DigisparkRGB
  5. Make sure your Digispark is unplugged
  6. Click the ‘Upload’ button – an arrow pointing to the right and when it’s done compiling plug in your Digispark
  7. Your Digispark will after about 10 seconds start cycling through colours

If the computer does not recognize the Digispark try the following:

  • Try connecting it to another USB port or system
  • Try connecting it to the rear ports (if a desktop)
  • Try connecting it to a USB hub
  • Try a powered USB hub

If it won’t upload: Did you set your board AND programmer to Digispark in the Arduino IDE? If your Digispark doesn’t slide easily into your USB port it needs a little filing to remove tabs from when the board. Feel on the edge that goes into the USB and you’ll feel what’s stopping it from sliding in nicely.

Digispark pinouts

All pins can be used as Digital I/O

  • Pin 0 ? I2C SDA, PWM (LED on Model B)
  • Pin 1 ? PWM (LED on Model A)
  • Pin 2 ? I2C SCK, Analog
  • Pin 3 ? Analog In (also used for USB+ when USB is in use)
  • Pin 4 ? PWM, Analog (also used for USB- when USB is in use)
  • Pin 5 ? Analog In

Model A & B

Taken from http://digistump.com/board/index.php?topic=134.0

Model B was the design we presented on Kickstarter (or the final version of it) LED was on P0 because that made for a very simple quick start, the trace was cut-table for \”advanced\” users using I2C – these are what we put into production right after the Kickstarter ended.

After we started to see more and more people buying and adding I2C devices (at first they were the least popular) and through our own work with the Digispark found that I2C was much more essential then we thought we made the change to Model A (called model A since it will be the main version moving forward, unless we revise it again) – so we ended up with 1/3 model B and 2/3 model A – we had to decide between this or all Model B version, we thought it\’d be better to push the change mid-production rather than have everyone get a Model B. That said we feel Model B works just as well, we personally cut the LED once we have a circuit debugged anyway, it is easy to do, and is the device presented on the Kickstarter.

Identification

Three models have been shipped. They have no feature differences, only a different connection for the on-board LED.

Model A

You can identify your model by the presence of “rev2”, “rev4”, or nothing on the top (the side with the gold connectors) of the USB end of the Digispark.

The on-board LED is connected to P1. This board should cause no conflicts with any devices, but remember the LED is on pin 1 not pin 0!

Model B

No marking: The on-board LED is connected to P0 This board requires the trace to the LED to be cut (or the LED desoldered) if you’d like to use it with I2C devices

Use an exact-o knife or similar small sharp blade. The area that needs to be scored or cut is outlined with a white box on the board – highlighted in red below for clarity.

To reconnect the LED for non I2C use, one can solder across the white box from the led to the closest pin of the IC.

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